How to Make a Large Quantity of Tea - Floral Tea Set with Lots of CupsAre you wondering how to make a large quantity of tea, all at once?

Perhaps you’re hosting a tea party? Or, maybe you want to make a big ol’ pitcher of iced tea to keep in the fridge? Or likely, maybe you just don’t think that 8 ounces of tea in a standard serving is enough. (Yeah, me neither…)

On the back of each and every package of CommuniTea Center tea, we have specific directions on how to prepare it. For consistency’s sake, we have kept with the industry standard of 8 ounces per portion. However, most people don’t drink only 8 ounces at a time.

So what’s a tea lover to do if you want to make more tea? Read on…!

 

How to Make a Large Quantity of Tea

No matter the amount of tea you’re preparing, there are always three factors at play:

 

Helpful hint:

Whether you’re preparing a gallon or a cup of tea,

the time and temperature recommendations will not change!

 

So… Tip #1: Follow the Directions on the Package for Time and Temperature

How to Make a Large Quantity of Tea - Example Packages with Directions

 

For example, if you’re making Just Peachy, you should use hot water, just under a boil, and steep for 3-4 minutes before removing the tea leaves.

By contrast, if you’re steeping Jasmine Green, we recommend 180° water and only a 3-minute steep.

If you’re preparing non-CommuniTea Center tea (gasp!!), then please follow the directions, wherever they are on your tea package. If there are no instructions, then call up that tea company and yell at them for leaving you to flounder.

Just don’t mention that Stephanie from CommuniTea Center told you to do it… 😜

 

Tip #2: Do a Little Math

Yes, math. The subject everyone loves to hate. Bear with me here:

 

The quantity of tea leaves will depend on the quantity of tea you’re preparing.

So you need to figure out how many 8-ounce servings will fit in your container.

 

Sometimes this is easy.

  • For example, if you’re using a 16-oz Tea Traveler, that holds 2 servings (16 = 2 x 8 oz). So, you use double (2x) the amount of tea suggested on the package.
  • Or, if you’re using one of CommuniTea Center’s Ceramic Teapots, one pot makes 3 servings (24 = 3 x 8 oz). So use triple (3x) the amount of tea in the directions.
  • Or, perhaps you want to use a beautiful Glass Teapot. Technically, these hold 25 ounces, but honestly, just use 3 servings of tea. It’s close enough. Even easier, if you have a sample-size package, just put the whole thing in the teapot (either ceramic or glass!). Sample packages contain 3 servings of tea already!

 

Tip #3: Do a Little (More) Math

However, sometimes it gets a little harder, and the numbers don’t work out exactly. But you can do it, I promise!

  • For example, our Tea Glasses or our Tea for One sets each hold 14 ounces. That means you use a little less than 2 servings of tea.
  • Most mugs hold more than 8 ounces. They may hold 12 oz (1 1/2 servings of tea) to 16 oz (2 servings) or maybe even more. Find out the capacity of your favorite tea-drinking mug to know how much tea to use…

 

If you’re making a big pitcher, then scale up with the tea leaves (or tea bags) accordingly.

  • A 64-oz or 2-quart container means you should use 8 servings of tea.
  • A 96-oz or 3-quart container should take 12 servings of tea.
  • Etc.

 

How to Make a Large Quantity of Tea - A Row of Tea Cups Set for a Tea PartyNow that you know how to make a large quantity of tea, the most important thing to remember is:

 

Use the time and temperature recommendations on the package. Those don’t change. Ever.*

 

Even if it’s a really large quantity, don’t steep too long, or your tea may become bitter. And that would be so unfortunate!

 

*I lied. They change if you’re cold-brewing tea (method #1). There’s an exception to every rule. But more on this later!

 

 

So now you know how to make a large quantity of tea. And if you want to make it into iced tea, then please check out Iced Tea 101!

 

 

If you enjoyed this Tea Blog post, then we think you’ll also enjoy…

 

… Tea at Home: Why Does It Taste Different When I Make It?

… Re-Steeping Tea: Get More out of Each Cup!

Water for Tea: Tap, Bottled, or Filtered… Which Water Makes the Best Tea?